Shock Trauma

Baltimore Shock Trauma

As a photographer I am always looking for something new and exciting to shoot,  however sometimes the best way to grow as  photographer is to revisit some of your older work. Two years ago I had the chance to cover the Shock Trauma Center at Maryland University Hospital in downtown Baltimore. I chose this assignment because I wanted to capture the everyday grind that many doctors and nurses across the U.S. encounter. These are just some of the hero's who work tirelessly throughout the day and night to save lives.

In the Shock Trauma Center the majority of patients are flown in by the Maryland State Police's emergency medical helicopter. These patients are generally transported here with severe and life threatening injuries that require around the clock medical attention. R Adams Cowley, M.D.  is credited with  establishing the "Golden Hour" theory, that relies on speed and skill in the operating room to save one's life. "There is a golden hour between life and death. If you are critically injured you have less than 60 minutes to survive. You might not die right then; it may be three days or two weeks later, but something has happened in your body that is irreparable."  

 

 The day begins

The day begins

 The pit. All nurses and doctors reside here during their shift  The pit is surrounded by trauma bays. 

The pit. All nurses and doctors reside here during their shift  The pit is surrounded by trauma bays. 

 The younger doc's receive instruction by one of the experienced "white coats"

The younger doc's receive instruction by one of the experienced "white coats"

 This is a direct phone line to the pilots in the air who report back vital information on inbound patients. Patient injuries and  accident history is recorded on this dry-erase board as the patients are flown to the Trauma Center. 

This is a direct phone line to the pilots in the air who report back vital information on inbound patients. Patient injuries and  accident history is recorded on this dry-erase board as the patients are flown to the Trauma Center. 

 On the roof waiting for the helo to land. 

On the roof waiting for the helo to land. 

 Time is of the essence 

Time is of the essence 

 Many times, the on-scene responder will fly with the patient to provide any emergency care as they fly from the scene to the hospital. 

Many times, the on-scene responder will fly with the patient to provide any emergency care as they fly from the scene to the hospital. 

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 Hang Glider Accident. Patient had severe head trauma. 

Hang Glider Accident. Patient had severe head trauma. 

 Catching a quick break before the next helo arrives. 

Catching a quick break before the next helo arrives. 

 Patients come from all walks of life

Patients come from all walks of life

 "Check the batteries"

"Check the batteries"

 This individual claimed to have fallen off his front porch, breaking his leg.  A further investigation  found that the broken leg was due to a gunshot. These are rods being inserted into his leg. 

This individual claimed to have fallen off his front porch, breaking his leg.  A further investigation  found that the broken leg was due to a gunshot. These are rods being inserted into his leg. 

 This individual had a permanent visitor for his entire stay.

This individual had a permanent visitor for his entire stay.

 The calls kept coming this night, note that every square is filled 

The calls kept coming this night, note that every square is filled 

 Stitches to the face

Stitches to the face

 Always working.

Always working.

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 An hour before shift change

An hour before shift change

 Shift change.  End of the day for some, and the beginning for others. 

Shift change.  End of the day for some, and the beginning for others. 

 

Faces of the Trauma Center